How To Make A DIY Boho Wall Hanging

DIY Boho Style Wall Hanging

Make this gorgeous DIY boho style wall hanging, and give your mental health a huge boost whilst doing it! Some days you feel a bit ‘meh’ but you know that making something will shake you out of it. However, you really need a simple craft project that doesn’t involve too much thinking, and definitely no tricky patterns. Feeling this way the other day I decided I wanted to make a wool wall hanging that I could put together in just a few hours but would still look amazing. So, I raided my wool stash and craft box and set to work.

JUST STARTED CRAFTING? CLICK BELOW FOR THE COMPLETE KIT!

YOU CAN BUY THE COMPLETE WALL HANGING KIT HERE

Create beautiful, sustainable modern décor for the home!

There’s something about no-fuss DIY crafts that are so satisfying. Maybe it’s because they’re usually quick and easy to put together, so you can see the finished result almost immediately. Or maybe it’s because they don’t require any fancy materials or complicated techniques, so anyone can do them. Whatever the reason, no-fuss crafts are the perfect way to shake off a case of the “meh’s.”

What resulted was a beautifully calming wall hanging, with a lovely beachy vibe, made from bits of wool, old jewellery, beads and ribbons, and I wanted to share how easy it was to make and also let me take a break from myself for a few, no stress, hours.

Find all of my video tutorials at: THE FELT HUB ON YOUTUBE

This ridiculously simple craft project can be completed, and displayed on your wall, in less than 3 hours! How amazing is that!

CHOOSING YOUR COLOUR COMBINATIONS FOR WINNING RESULTS

A colour palette is important for most art and craft projects – it helps to set the mood and tone of your work, and can also be used to create a cohesive look. When you are choosing a colour palette, it’s important to think about what mood you want to convey. Do you want your work to be calm and serene, or bold and vibrant? Once you’ve decided on the overall feel of your project, you can start choosing specific colours. If you’re unsure where to start, a good place is with a limited palette of just a few colours. This will help you to focus on working with a specific range of hues, and also give your work a more unified look. As you become more comfortable with working with different colours, you can start experimenting with different palettes, adding in new shades and tones as you go. Ultimately, the best way to choose a colour palette is to follow your instincts and go with whatever feels right for you and your work.

For this no fuss, DIY boho wall hanging, I picked out lovely muted colours – wool, ribbon and beads – with a calming feel but soon realised that a pop of colour was needed to give the project a lift. A bright mustard colour turned out to be perfect for the job and really brings the piece to life! It’s amazing how such a small change can make such a big difference. If you’re ever feeling stuck with a project, add a pop of colour and see how it transforms your work!

GATHER YOUR WOOL AND FIBRE STASH TOGETHER

I have used a selection of wool tops, wool yarn, silk ribbon, beads, glass, cotton rope, and driftwood; although any old branch from the garden or walk will do.

SUSTAINABLE CRAFTS – REUSE AND RECYCLE

I love finding new ways to reuse and recycle materials that I already have on hand for my DIY craft projects. Not only is it budget friendly, but it also reduces the amount of waste I produce. For this wall hanging, I used wool tops and yarn that were left over from other projects, as well as beads and glass that I found in charity shops and my old costume jewellery that I used to wear a million years ago, well it seems that way… I love how this easy wall hanging came together with materials that might otherwise have been discarded. It’s a great reminder that even everyday items can be turned into something beautiful if we just use a little creativity.

CLICK FOR MORE SUSTAINABLE WOOL CRAFTS

TAKE THE CREATIVITY OUTSIDE

Crafting outside is a surefire way to lift your mood and what could be better than crafting outdoors on a beautiful spring day? The sunshine and fresh air are sure to lift your mood, and the relaxed atmosphere will help you to get in touch with your creative side. So, as it was a sunny Spring day here in blighty I thought I would make the most of it and take the creativity into the garden. The craft project I was working on was a simple one, but it was so satisfying to be able to complete it while surrounded by nature. I felt so much happier and more relaxed after spending some time crafting outside, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who is looking for a mood boost.

HOW DO I GET STARTED?

GETTING STARTED IS OFTEN THE HARDEST PART

Starting your project is often the hardest part, and I spent quite a lot of time pondering about design when really I just needed to get stuck in! I decided to stop pontificating (I love that word!) and start with a simple base of cotton rope, the kind you would use in macramé. However, any yarn, or even fabric strips would look just as good. The trick is to just start. After that it is a breeze! Once you have your base material, simply start adding your materials. You can make whatever pattern you like, and there is no right or wrong way to do it. I went for the ‘less is more’ approach as my temptation is to behave like a toddler decorating the Christmas tree. That said, if that’s your preference then you go for it! The key is to have fun and be creative. Just let your imagination run wild, and before you know it you will have created a one-of-a-kind piece of art.

Simple cotton rope backdrop mounted on a piece of driftwood

ET VOILA!

I love the finished result which, combined with the driftwood and soft tropical colours, is giving me summer vibes; something we can only hope for here in blighty. All in all it took around three hours. This included gathering of materials plus an hour of faffing, pondering, and trimming time. I am thrilled with the finished result and I love the boho, chilled, beachy look. The cotton rope backdrop is perfect and plaiting some of the lovely wool tops adds more interest and texture. I hope you enjoyed reading about the process and it has inspired you to try this project for yourself. This project was so much fun to do and I love how it turned out. The contrast of the white cotton against the colorful wool tops is beautiful, and the texture of the rope adds an interesting dimension. It’s exactly the look I was going for and I can’t wait to hang this up in my home and enjoy the relaxed, beachy vibe it creates. SEE MORE TUTORIALS IN THE FELT HUB ON YOUTUBE!

NO MORE ‘MEH’

We all know how good it feels to escape into a creative project every now and again. It’s a wonderful way to take a break from the hustle and bustle of everyday life and relax into a slower pace for a few hours. And, best of all, when you’re finished you have a beautiful piece to show for your efforts. The result was exactly what I hoped for: a beautiful, no-stress wall hanging that makes me feel good every time I look at it. If you’re feeling in need of a creative escape, why not give this project a try? You might just find that it’s exactly what you needed.

P.S. YOU CAN BUY THE COMPLETE WALL HANGING KIT HERE

HAVE YOU TRIED NEEDLE FELTING?

If you haven’t tried needle felting, you’re in for a treat! This amazing craft is perfect for all skill levels, from beginner to advanced, and I have been teaching this craft since 2014! Needle felting is extremely versatile – you can use it to create all sorts of stunning artwork, from animal sculptures, to jewellery, to home décor. No sewing or tricky patterns plus, needle felting is a great way to relax and de-stress. And there’s no need to worry about being short on ideas, either – this blog is jam-packed with needle felting tutorials, tips, and tricks. So what are you waiting for? Click HERE for the menus on this blog and get started on your needle felting journey today!

HOW TO USE WIRE FOR NEEDLE FELTING?

DO I EVEN NEED TO USE WIRE FOR NEEDLE FELTING?

I am often asked how to use wire for needle felting, and is it even needed? The short answer is no. In fact I rarely use a full wire armature because I like a firm felt. However, using wire in specific areas can really help you create the shape you need, and create more detail and dimension.

WHEN SHOULD I USE WIRE FOR NEEDLE FELTING?

Use it in the neck of a sheep so you can pose the head, or the horns and tail of an animal to create great shapes. If you want super thin legs or arms then wire is a great solution. Alternatively, make limbs around a BBQ skewer (the ‘farmers friend’ of needle felting), to create smooth legs and perfect symmetry in super fast time. Using the BBQ skewer as a tool negates the need for using wire altogether for many projects.

USING A BBQ SKEWER WILL CHANGE THE WAY YOU NEEDLE FELT!

Parsley, the needle felted hare seen below has no wire anywhere. This gorgeous needle felting project was made, almost entirely, using a wooden BBQ skewer. I started using this method back in 2017 and it has made teaching needle felting, and creating projects, so much easier!

CLICK HERE FOR

PARSLEY HARE NEEDLE FELTING KIT or PATTERN DOWNLOAD AND PRINTABLE

Watch the video tutorial, at the bottom of the post, from our Friday night felt along on the FACEBOOK GROUP, or follow the mini tutorial below, and you will be amazed at how professional the finished result is, even if you have never needle felted before!

Happy Felting!

HOW TO NEEDLE FELT FIRM LEGS WITHOUT WIRE – QUICK AND EASY TUTORIAL

Scroll to bottom of the post for the video tutorial.

Make Time: Super fast! Approximately 20 minutes for both legs plus faffing time…

You will need:

The needle felting kit and pattern are available via the links below and you can join the new FACEBOOK GROUP HERE

LOOK, NO WIRE? Making Perfect Legs Around A Wooden BBQ Skewer

As I mentioned, if string is a ‘farmers friend’ then a wooden BBQ skewer is most definitely a ‘felters friend’. Never be without one as it will change the way you needle felt, drastically reducing the chore of hours spent smoothing and shaping.

This is super easy, but technique is important and you may have a couple of false starts as the legs need to be kept tight and narrow, but that’s ok. Just unravel and start again. When finished they will be firm and smooth and the last couple of centimetres will be built up for the feet/paws. TOP TIP: Remember to keep the top of the legs very loose as they will be attached to the body and should look like they are part of the finished project, not just stuck on.

Let’s get going!

1 Select a length of carded wool or wool top/roving and split down the middle. This means that both legs will use equal amounts of wool and sizes will be more or less the same.

2 Start to wrap the wool tightly around the skewer, starting close to the top of the stick. TOP TIP: Keep the wool flat between your thumb and finger so the wool doesn’t twist and become lumpy and uneven.

3 Keeping the wool tight, continue for a little way then stop and felt around the entire area to secure. TOP TIP: Work at a diagonal angle around the sides of the stick keeping hold of the wool so it doesn’t become loose. If it does, unwrap and start again. This will also avoid bending or breaking the needle.

4 Continue with the process until the leg is approximately two thirds of its final length (you will see why when you remove it from the skewer) and add more wool to the foot to widen it. Continue to felt and shape the foot until it is firm. TOP TIP: A foot/paw that is significantly bigger than the rest of the leg will have more impact when your project is finished.

5 Remove from the stick and felt a little more but avoid the top of the leg as this needs to be kept loose for attaching to the body. TO TIP: Don’t worry if the shape is not perfect as you are going to fix that in a moment.

6 You are now going to roll the leg firmly in your hands to firm and smooth it, which will also lengthen it. When you do this keep the top of the leg sticking out, so the wool remains loose. In just a few seconds of firm rolling you will see how the leg has really firmed up and become even smoother without the need for any wires. TOP TIP: Don’t over roll it as it will become longer than needed.

Here’s what some of the fabulous Facebook group made during the live workshop! It’s a great technique that can be adapted to almost any project. Join the group HERE and come along to the free live events.

I was blown away by the quality, personality and individual styles of the projects from the FACEBOOK GROUP members and the amazing feedback has been so good!

VIDEO TUTORIAL – Felt along with me!

Watch the full tutorial and felt alongside me, workshop style.

How To Needle Felt With Confidence

NEEDLE FELTING ISN’T HARD, BUT STARTING CAN BE

TOP TOP TIP – ALLOW YOURSELF TO BE A BEGINNER! It’s often hard to find your confidence when you start needle felting, even harder if you haven’t done any crafting before, so tackling those fears is the first hurdle. The second hurdle is finding a good tutorial and materials guide that will give you the best chance of success. I can help with both of those things but you have the most important job, and that’s allowing yourself to be a beginner. And, as sure as eggs is eggs, if you don’t allow yourself a period of ‘learning’ grace you are setting yourself to fail. In fact, you have to get it wrong in order to succeed and believe me, when it comes to needle felting success comes very quickly.

FEAR OF FAILURE – TIME TO CHANGE THE NARRATIVE

We are, so often, our own worst critics, and we use it as self preservation technique so we don’t have to start something i.e. a new craft. We literally talk ourselves out of it before we have even tried. It is like a fail safe but it can be very self destructive. So, time to change the narrative and, when you think to yourself, ‘I’ve failed’ simply change the statement to ‘I have learned’, and see how that self doubt just falls away. Each time you do this your confidence will grow, as will your skill set. Changing the mindset, that makes you way too hard on yourself, is the most important thing you will learn when it comes to starting a new craft, and that confidence will also find its way into many other aspects of our life.

FEAR OF WHAT OTHERS WILL THINK

We often spend so much time worrying what others will say and, the truth is, they will probably be super impressed that you are learning a new skill. If not then the problem is probably their own self confidence and lack of courage to try something new themselves. Ask yourself who you are doing it for? The answer should always be you! If you really struggle then don’t show your felt creations to anyone until you feel ready, and then not at all if that is how you feel.

CRAFTS ARE SUPPOSED TO BE FUN…

Always remember, you are doing this for you and no one else. Crafts are all about you, and the enjoyment of just making, so try and loose yourself in those creative moments.

NEVER COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS!

Be realistic and always remember that they started off exactly the same way as you…as a complete beginner! If you are on chapter 1 and they are chapter 5 then it’s hardly a fair comparison, and it’s a sure fire way to ruin your day, and knock your confidence at the same time. Find your needle felting feet, learn the basics well, then start to look for inspiration. Also, it is completely normal to think ‘I will never be able to make that’. Honestly, time and practice will change your mind.

DON’T UNDERESTIMATE THE MENTAL HEALTH BENEFITS OF CRAFTS

Anxiety, loneliness, isolation and depression have never been more prevalent than they are in today’s society, and with good reason; a global pandemic, climate change, rising prices, job insecurity, fear for our kids, caring for others, the list goes on and on… But, amidst all of that, the world is still full of great people and creativity. If we just prescribed ourselves some craft therapy on a regular basis then everything will feel calmer, more grounded, safer. And, if that is just for the time you are involved in something that distracts you from the daily stresses and strains it will allow you to go about your day in a much better state of mind. If not needle felting then a jigsaw, sewing, growing house plants, gardening, reading, knitting, colour by numbers, in fact anything that requires your undivided attention. Even though it can be hard it is so important to create a little time to focus on yourself, even if only for half an hour. And fortunately needle felting is incredibly portable so, if you can’t find a quiet space or the household won’t leave you alone, I have often found the loo to be a good alternative. As I said, needle felting is very portable 😉

ARE YOU READY TO START NEEDLE FELTING NOW?

Let’s get going. The video tutorial below is an introduction to creating a really simple shape that will become the most important technique you will learn when first starting needle felting. It can be made in just 5-10 minutes and will act as the structure, or scaffolding for the rest of your project. My tutorials are very workshop style and are the nearest thing to one of my in person classes. Simplicity and speed are the cornerstone of all my tutorials and I am always looking for new techniques to help improve your needle felting journey as well as give you the confidence to fall in love with this craft as much as I have. I have added links for the playlist that will teach you how to complete hares, sheep, mice, foxes, badgers, gnomes and too many to mention, with ease. You just need to be enthusiastic and willing to learn.

DON’T HAVE ANY NEEDLE FELTING EQUIPMENT?

All needle felting kits and supplies can be found on HERE on the Lincolnshire Fenn Crafts website

Happy felting!

HOW TO START NEEDLE FELTING – INTRODUCTION VIDEO

QUICK DO’S AND DON’TS GUIDE TO NEEDLE FELTING

Click HERE for my quick do’s and don’ts guide to needle felting.

NEEDLE FELTING VIDEO TUTORIALS – BEGINNERS PLAYLIST

MAKE ALL THE NEEDLE FELTED THINGS!

Needle felted hares and sheep are always popular for beginners, needle felted gnomes and pumpkins can be made in just 30 minutes, and why not rustle up a macaron or two in just 15 minutes! Needle felting ideas and tutorials are endless so checkout the menus at the top of the page and make all the needle felted things!

Improve Your Needle Felting Techniques

Parsley hare is one of my favourite hare designs and, with a touch of whimsy and a dash of folk art, you can’t fail to be charmed by him. This is such a great project that is perfect if you want to build on your existing needle felting skills. It’s a project that requires some previous experience of needle felting and assumes you have completed at least two beginners needle felting projects.

The ‘Magic’ Tool

Everything is made around a wooden skewer (apart from the ears) and is the tool that no self respecting needle felter should be without. If you haven’t used one before it is a complete needle felting revelation and you will wonder how you ever managed without one. It is also a great way to make perfect needle felted balls and acorn shapes in just three minutes.

Banish Saggy Legs Forever

Using the wooden BBQ skewer negates the need for using wire but still ensures that you have really firm body parts.

Create A Perfect Finish

Using this technique also allows you to get great symmetry, with ease, and a beautifully smooth finish. You can also create a perfectly shaped head every time, no lumps or bumps.

The Wool

Use a good coarse wool top or, as I have done with mine, use carded wool in long lengths.

Materials List:

  • Coarse brown wool top or long carded lengths
  • White accent wool
  • 1 Felting needle – size 38 is a good all rounder
  • 1 Wooden skewer
  • 2 Beads for eyes
  • Lace ruffle
  • Felting mat

The needle felting kit, wool and accessories can be found on the Lincolnshire Fenn Crafts WEBSITE and the kit comes with everything you need including the lovely antique style ruffle.

Video Tutorials

Below are five step by step, easy to follow video tutorials. If you prefer to work with written instructions the pattern is also available for instant download HERE

Happy Felting!

Video Introduction

 

Video 1 – Body And Head

Video 2 – Legs

Video 3 – Ears

Video 4 – Putting It Together

needle felted sheep picture

How To Needle Felt A Picture

All photographs and finished pictures are Lincolnshire Fenn Crafts originals so please make sure to credit my pictures as inspiration should you decide to use them as reference for your own picture. This also applies to all social media and blog pages. Copies of my picture must not be sold! However I am happy for them to be gifted as long as full credit is given. All copyright laws apply.

I have had lots of requests to put together a quick guide to get you started on needle felting a 2D/3D picture so, using my own pictures as inspiration, here it is. It is suitable for all abilities (including complete beginners) and you can work at your own level and at your own pace. If this is your first time needle felting then please watch my beginner video tutorials to familiarise yourself with basic techniques:

HOW TO NEEDLE FELT

BASIC SHAPE VIDEO TUTORIAL

If you are new to needle felting, or don’t have many colours, I have put together a picture pack containing a carefully chosen wool selection, natural pre-felt and natural effect fibres that can be used for needle felting and wet felting. I will be focusing on needle felting but you can adapt to suit whatever project you are working on.

Shop Picture Needle Felting Kit

Preparation and planning is really important. I find using a photograph of a landscape, animal, woodland scene etc for reference/inspiration really helpful. It can be the roughest of guides or very specific to the photograph or image you have in mind. You may have a particular animal you want to incorporate into the picture which is also a great starting point; anything goes.

For this guide I am creating fields as the backdrop with a 2 D wooden gate, Herdwick Sheep and pebble wall in the foreground. It is called, ‘Watching Me, Watching Ewe.’ I know, cheese on toast right… but it was too good an opportunity not to. You should hear my pirate jokes. I save those for special occasions, usually workshops.  #sorrynotsorry to anyone who has been at the receiving end of them…

Enough pre-amble, lets get started.


1 – Using a piece of *pre-felt for the back of your picture take a marker or chalk to, very roughly, draw out your idea on to the pre-felt: ZERO DRAWING SKILLS REQUIRED. This way you can ensure that you can fit in all the elements you want to use.

* I always use pure Shetland but any 100% wool felt is OK. Size of the pre-felt I used for this picture is approx 20cm square. A 30cm square is included in the picture pack.

2 – I am making a *Herdwick picture with a landscape backdrop and stone wall to get lots of 2D elements in there. It’s quite a small picture; 20cm square to fit into some lovely shadow boxes I have. Also, starting with a smaller picture means there is less white space to fill which can be a little daunting and it takes less time.

*All photographs and finished pictures are Lincolnshire Fenn Crafts originals so please make sure to credit my pictures as inspiration should you decide to use them as reference for your own picture. All copyright laws apply.

Instructional diagram on needle felting herdwick sheep

3 – Mark your colours and objects so you know where your wool and 2D elements are going to sit. Keep it as simple as possible and remember these are just your guide lines.

4 – Time to get out your wool and needles. I am using a star 36/38 needles (good all rounders) and a punch tool (7 needles) to speed up the process.

5 – I felted the landscape first but you can start wherever you want depending on your picture style. I will be felting on my 2D elements later and adding embellishment. Lay your colour on, or between the lines, you have drawn, and use your needle to gently felt into place. It doesn’t have to be firmly felted but should stay in position.

I have used a mix of coarse wool tops and some semi carded wool tops that I had a lot of.

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6 – Continue to gently needle felt your selected colours until the back ground is full.

7 – If you are happy with the layout then go ahead and felt the whole background more firmly (but not too flat), peeling it off your mat at intervals so it doesn’t stick. If you are doing a lot of flat felting then I recommend a rice filled hessian or strong cotton felting pad and a punch tool. Trust me, you will thank me later for cutting your felting time by three quarters.

Don’t worry if you have covered up some of your lines; remember they were just a guide.

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You can also blend colours either by hand or using blending brushes (glorified dog brushes). For this picture I used a blend of Shetland blue top, light blue silk fibre and light grey Swaledale top for the sky.

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8 – I wanted a distinct line separating the fields and used very thin strips of dark brown Jacob wool top to achieve this. Felt the lines quite firmly into the pre-felt which will push it down and give a little more depth.

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Time to create some 2D elements.

9 – Wall

I have used lots of muted colours to create the pebbled wall appearance. Avoid all ‘flat’ colours by blending different colour wool by hand; if using the landscape box some colours will not need blending as they will already have texture and different shades. A soft palette works really well for this style of picture e.g purple blended with white, dark grey blended with white or light grey

Make your stones by rolling your wool into a very rough ball shape (this is not the shape you will end up with but will create dimension) and felting all over with your needle. Keep the wool moving as it firms up and don’t try to make it even; have you ever seen even shapes on a dry stone wall… Make quite a few different shapes and sizes; mine are  approx 1.5cm to 2.5cm then place them on your picture in the walled area to see how many more you will actually need.

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Once done stitch or glue them into position; I’m not a purist and whichever you choose is fine. Clearly, using glue is so much faster and a strong fabric glue will do just fine as long as you give it a little time to dry. Using glue also allows you to move your pebbles about before the glue dries; you will be ready for a cuppa at this stage anyway.

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10 – Time to make the Herdwick sheep head (or whichever animal you have chosen).

Please follow the link to the video tutorial: How to needle felt a head shape  You will want to flatten the back of the head so it sits nicely on your picture. You can then needle felt your eyes or use beads (included in the picture pack).

11- Start with a small length of white wool (approx 2g) and roll into a rough oval shape felting (stabbing gently with your needle) and tucking in the ends as you go.  Gently felt until it holds its shape and turning as you felt. Continue to felt until you have achieved a rough egg/oval shape. Now flatten the back of the head by needle felting until it sits flat on the picture but don’t attach it yet; it’s ears are missing.

12 – Ears: For the ears take a pinch of white wool. Lay it on your pad and draw a rough circle with your felting needle and fold the wool around the line you have drawn, felting it into the centre. Turn over (to prevent from sticking) and repeat a few times, leaving one end loose (to attach to the head) and felt until flat, smooth and slightly firm. Repeat for other ear. Attach the loose end of each ear to the side of the head and felt or sew into position so it is peeping over the wall.

13 – Gently felt on very thin wisps (even thinner than that) onto the face to create the nose and mouth. N.B. Easiest way is to roll very thin wisps of wool between your fingers before felting to the face. Alternatively, you can sew on using black or dark grey thread.

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14 – Add your gate by rolling and felting your brown wool into short lengths and overlapping for effect before gently felting into position. You may reposition a few times before you are happy with it.

15 – Add your wool for the body of your animal but don’t felt it flat and keep it quite loose as this will create dimension. I have used loose curly grey locks.

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16- Now add your foreground details. I have used greens and some locks for a grassy feel but be as creative as you wish. You could add flowers, butterflies, bees etc.

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17 – Finishing touches make all the difference and as you can see I have used french knots (easy and absolutely no need to be perfect). YouTube French Knot Tutorial. Curly locks also add more interest and dimension.

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There you have it. Super easy 2D picture tutorial.

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I have done a few pictures which are so worth the time they take. Here are a few more ideas for inspiration.

‘Asleep Under The Cherry Tree’ A gift for my daughter.

Again, I have used French Knots as well as beads for interest and detail.

 

 


‘Midnight At The Northern Lights’ 

Midnight is the name of my hare in the picture and inspiration came from my dream of visiting the  Northern Lights.

 

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You can also use wet felted pictures as a base and then add  two dimensional effects using needle felting. Free motion embroidery works really well on wet felted backgrounds. Below is a very unfinished picture waiting for me to decide what to do next. I have needle felted onto Shetland pre-felt then wet felted the whole scene incorporating locks and silk fibres.

There are lots of YouTube videos showing wet felting techniques: Wet Felting Tutorial

 

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So there you have it. The possibilities are endless and I hope this guide has inspired you to try something new. Happy creating!

If you would like a picture pack then please click on the link below for the website. You can also find my favourite selection of needle felting accessories and tools.

Shop website wool bundle

Est. 2013
© 2013 Lincolnshire Fenn Crafts