Wool Storage Ideas And How To Avoid Moths Without Chemicals?

When it comes to crafts and wool storage, there is no such thing as a spare room; what an utterly ridiculous concept!? However, the easier it is to access our precious wool the more felting can be done. So, assuming we don’t have an entire house free for wool storage, what is the solution to storing our wool efficiently and safely?

There are three simple but important rules for keeping your wool in the best condition:

1 Keep it out of direct sunlight!

2 Keep the moisture out!

3 Avoid creating a welcome home for moths!

Save this photo to Pinterest for later!

 

Light And Moisture

Direct sunlight will, over time, bleach the colour out of your wool. A brightly lit room is fine (moths hate the light) as long as your wool is in containers that protect it from UV rays or the containers are facing away from the light. IMPORTANT! Don’t use sealed bags in a warm room because the moisture will build up inside and moisture is also wools enemy.

Much of my wool is in a very brightly lit room (below) but I remove it from the plastic bags and store it in black bins with lids, or open fronted stacking boxes, facing away from the windows. I don’t have any problems with fading wool or moisture (even in the summer) because the air can still circulate. No moth problem either because they hate bright light. For smaller amounts in bright rooms you can use cardboard shoe boxes, craft boxes, drawers, jute bags, etc.

 

What if you can’t store it in a brightly lit room?

If you are keeping wool in a dark room, drawer or cupboard – and many of us do – make sure they are in airtight containers or bags; this will keep the moths out. If you are concerned about moisture then wrap some kitchen roll or a tea towel around it before sealing. Silica gel sachets are also another moisture deterrent. Also, if your wool is stored for long periods, it is good practice to take it out occasionally air it and check for moisture.

Moth Deterrents Without Chemicals

A proactive approach is always best and Lavender and Cedar are good natural deterrents as the smell confuses the moths, throwing them off the scent in the hunt for your precious wool stash. However, neither will kill an infestation and, if the moth eggs are already there you will need to remove and dispose of the contaminated wool. There are hundreds of ‘remedies’ on the internet for getting rid of them but, as with everything, prevention is better than cure. Thankfully, in the nine years I have been using wool I have never had a moth problem (or used Lavender and Cedar) so, hopefully, neither will you.

Storage Ideas

I recently asked my Facebook community how they were storing their wool and they had some cracking storage solutions for large, and small amounts of wool which I thought I would share with you.

Jane has inventively stashed her wool in cardboard poster tubes with all the colours cleverly sticking out of each end. Or, if If you want quick access to all your lovely wool, then Lesley’s easy desk set up, using takeaway containers, is just the job. It’s also a great way of ogling your wool stash and thinking about which wool you are going to try next?

Sharon has stored all her lovely wool and locks in these handy compartment boxes. I think I have seen similar in B&Q and Argos? The tool storage aisle is always a great place to look and probably cheaper than the hobby stores. Sock drawer organisers are also a great way to store your wool in a similar way. It’s also a great portable solution so you can take your wool anywhere.

How’s this for super space saving ingenuity? Michelle has come up with a great solution for storing small amounts of wool in these fab jam jars which are the perfect shape for getting as much in a small space as possible. The six sided hexagon means that no space is wasted and is also the very reason that bees use the same pattern in their hives.

Open ended stacking trays are a great solution for storing wool, especially for a business that needs to store a lot of wool in the most efficient way possible. Door tidy’s are also a great way of utilising your space and keeping everything in one place.

Lin has cleverly used plastic shoe storage boxes and labelled each one so she can grab what she needs at a glance, and I love my craft drawers on wheels.

 

Kathy’s suitcases are an imaginative solution for storing your wool. However, Verity’s cat had other ideas???

I know there are hundreds more storage ideas but I hope this has given you some inspiration for keeping your own wool stash in the best condition possible and, if you are still struggling for space then the only option really is a second home???

If you want regular creative updates from me just sign up below.

Happy felting! x

Want to know more about felting wool?

6 thoughts on “Wool Storage Ideas And How To Avoid Moths Without Chemicals?

  1. Busy Bee 🐝

    Thanks Sandy and thanks must also go to everyone who contributed to your Facebook shout out for Storage Solutions. I had never given that much thought to storing all my wool and thought zip bags would be good for the job because I’d be able lift the bags to find the colours I was looking for! Once I’d finished reading your terrific and informative Blog Sandy I got right on to my “Personal Shopper” ie. Amazon and after having a good search around with my trusted tape measure I proceeded to order a pack of 8 transparent shoe boxes, sorted, well maybe sorted because I will have to turn each one from flat into a box lol.
    Many thanks and Happy weekend 🙏

  2. Tails Around the Ranch

    What clever and innovative storage ideas. They’ve got me thinking (always a dangerous thing) of new ways to make my stash more effective. Thanks for sharing. And I laughed out loud at the meme at the top. Too funny. 🐑

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.